Tutorials :

TTC Video - The Intelligent Brain [Reduced]

      Author: Baturi   |   29 October 2018   |   comments: 0

TTC Video - The Intelligent Brain [Reduced]

TTC Video - The Intelligent Brain
Course No. 1642 | .MP4, AVC, 200 kbps, 640x360 | English, AAC, 96 kbps, 2 Ch | 18x29 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 1.12 GB
Lecturer: Richard J. Haier, Ph.D.







Although many aspects of intelligence remain puzzling, researchers are now on their way to a detailed scientific explanation of what defines intelligence, where it comes from, and how it operates in the brain. Few fields of psychology are as crucial to the lives of people or the social policies of nations. An understanding of how the brain produces intelligence sheds light on questions such as these:

What's right and what's wrong with IQ tests?
Can intelligence be measured directly from the brain?
Can education or brain training enhance intelligence in children or adults?
Is intelligence constrained by genes?
What is the connection between intelligence and creativity?

The answers to these questions help determine policy decisions in education, employment, health care, and other fields. They also govern personal choices about how we want to lead our lives and raise our children. For example, is it realistic to gauge school success largely by rising test scores? Are everyday tools such as electronic devices unnecessarily complicated for most people to use? Or suppose a pill were available that could raise IQ. Would you take it? Would you allow your school-age children to take it?

The Intelligent Brain plunges you into a myriad of thought-provoking issues such as these in 18 stimulating half-hour lectures taught by Professor Richard J. Haier of the University of California, Irvine. Professor Haier is one of the world's foremost researchers on intelligence and a pioneer in the use of brain imaging technology to explore the workings of the human intellect.

Testing Intelligence

The modern history of intelligence research began with attempts to measure the differences that separate cognitively normal children from "abnormal" children. This was the origin of the first IQ test, designed by French psychologist Alfred Binet in the early 20th century. The Intelligent Brain traces the fascinating history of intelligence testing and its leading thinkers and their ideas, including the following:

g factor: First described by psychologist Charles Spearman over 100 years ago, g is the conjectured general factor of intelligence and is widely used today in research. It is not the same as IQ, which can be influenced by social and cultural factors, whereas g is thought to be largely innate.
Flynn effect: Challenging the idea of an innate g factor is James R. Flynn's research showing that average intelligence test scores have risen faster than can be explained by evolution. Critics contend that better education and test-taking skills help explain the increase, while leaving g relatively unchanged.
Multiple intelligences: Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences holds that instead of a single g factor there are diverse independent abilities-from facility with language to interpersonal skills. But if such abilities are not independent, is this evidence for the g model?
Arthur Jensen: The most infamous article in the history of psychology was written by Arthur Jensen, a prolific intelligence researcher. Professor Haier shows how Jensen's work on g factor differences among groups led to widespread criticism about the nature of intelligence.

While most of us are familiar with tests that assess intelligence through a long series of exacting questions, such as those on the college SAT, there may be a much simpler way to gauge intellectual ability. In this course, you get to try a stimulus/response exercise that is a shortcut to establishing mental quickness-and possibly intelligence.

Exploring Intelligence in Depth

As a pioneer in the field, Professor Haier was one of the first psychologists to use positron emission tomography (PET) to study brain function during tasks associated with intelligence. In addition, you investigate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a newer and more powerful imaging technology than PET that can reveal brain structure and rapid changes in brain activity and has helped pinpoint areas of the brain associated with high IQ.

These lectures are illustrated with dozens of PET, MRI, and other remarkable images, including animations that show the shifting pattern of activity in a thinking brain, shedding light on what goes on inside the mind at work. Professor Haier also enlivens his presentation with examples of questions from different intelligence tests, giving viewers a taste of the methods used to rank individuals on the intelligence scale.

The Intelligent Brain discusses some of his surprising findings, which include differences in brain function in males and females when they are engaged in the same challenge at the same performance level. These results show that not all brains work the same way. Professor Haier also presents evidence that brain efficiency, not increased mental effort, may be the hallmark of intelligence.















Buy Premium From My Links To Get Resumable Support,Max Speed & Support Me

скачать dle 12.0




Home        |        Register        |        Forums        |        RSS        |        Rules        |        DMCA Policy        |        Contact Us
DISCLAIMER
None of the files shown here are hosted or transmitted by this server. The links are provided solely by this site's users. The administrator of this site (dl4all.ws) cannot be held responsible for what its users post, or any other actions of its users. You may not use this site to distribute or download any material when you do not have the legal rights to do so. It is your own responsibility to adhere to these terms.

Copyright © 2018 Dl4All. All rights reserved.